A Senior-Savvy Police Force

Gerontologists urge law enforcement agencies to improve encounters with older adults.

For Seniors, Delirium Is a Hospital Hazard

Families should learn the symptoms of this condition so they can alert medical personnel if needed.

In-Home Care Supports Good Nutrition for People With Alzheimer's

March Is National Nutrition Month, a good time to focus on the special dietary challenges of seniors who are living with Alzheimer's disease or other dementia.

When the Caregiving Dynamic Is Complicated

What happens when you agree to provide care for an elderly parent, but your relationship with Mom or Dad has been difficult?

Was "Drink Less Alcohol" on Your List of New Year’s Resolutions?

Did you know that seniors today consume more alcohol than their counterparts of previous generations? This can put their health at serious risk.

Online Buzz: 5 Things We Learned From Reagan's Alzheimer's and Thatcher's Dementia

These powerful world leaders both struggled with cognitive decline.

Hosting the Holidays When Your Loved One Has Alzheimer’s Disease

You've always held a holiday party at your house, but now Mom has been diagnosed with dementia. Should you skip it this year?

Dementia Care the Musical Way

Music offers powerful emotional, intellectual and even physical benefits for people with memory loss. But experts caution that this therapy needs to be tailored to the person.

Six Reasons to Tell the Doctor About Memory Problems

Many seniors who notice problems with memory and thinking are inclined to downplay the situation. Here's why that's not a good idea.

Online Buzz: Medical Skepticism Over Brain Games

Brain games are a billion-dollar industry today. But do they really help us improve our memory and thinking?

Experts Say the Rate of Dementia Is Declining

The number of seniors living with Alzheimer's continues to climb—yet the percentage seems to be trending downward. What's behind this unexpected but welcome news?

Preserving Social Connections When a Loved One Has Alzheimer's

The need to spend time with others is a powerful human need, even when a person is living with memory loss.

Online Buzz: Sleep Deprivation and Alzheimer's Disease

People with dementia often experience poor sleep. Could the opposite also be true?

Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers Ask: "Am I at Risk?"

Families often are confused about whether a loved one's Alzheimer’s disease is "in the genes."

Online Buzz: The Alarming Numbers Behind Women and Alzheimer's

Women live longer—but that's not the only reason they are at higher risk of developing serious memory loss.

Online Buzz: The Overall Benefits of Dance

Dancing offers physical, mental and social benefits, which makes it a great form of brain exercise.

Activities to Encourage Engagement in People With Dementia

Apathy is a common symptom of Alzheimer's disease. What can families do when a loved one seems withdrawn from the world around them?

Older and Wiser?

Online games go viral to help researchers dispel myths about aging brains.

Dementia Care Experts Urge Replacing Psychiatric Drugs With DICE

Studies reveal alternatives to the antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs that have often been prescribed for people with Alzheimer's and related conditions.

Five Brain Health Reminders for Family Caregivers

Family caregivers do so much for their loved ones that they sometimes neglect their own health—and that could put them at higher risk for Alzheimer's disease.

Online Buzz: U.S. Alzheimer’s Rate Is Declining

While the rate continues to increase in some countries, studies suggest that Americans are making lifestyle choices that lower their risk.

March Is Brain Injury Awareness Month

The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases as we grow older. How can we prevent these potentially catastrophic events?

Should You Tell a "Fiblet" to a Parent With Dementia?

Is telling the truth always the best policy? Professional geriatric care managers offer advice on a sensitive subject.

Mental Exercise Helps the Brain "Work Around" the Damage of Alzheimer's Disease

Brain imaging shows that despite the presence of physical changes normally associated with dementia, some people remain mentally sharp.

Why Does My Loved One Rummage and Hide Things?

When a person is living with Alzheimer's disease or a related condition, family caregivers are often troubled by changes in the way their loved one acts. These changes, sometimes referred to as "behaviors" or "negative behaviors," are better considered for what they truly are: expressions of the person's needs, as distorted by the effects of the disease. Empathy and understanding that there may be a rational reason behind seemingly irrational actions helps caregivers devise strategies for preserving their loved one's safety and dignity while making things easier for family.

Dementia and Its Costs Soar Worldwide

September is World Alzheimer's Month. Alzheimer's Disease International sponsors this recognition event to call attention to the global impact of Alzheimer's, which knows no boundaries.

Online Buzz: Peanut Butter May Help Detect Alzheimer's

A dollop of peanut butter and a ruler may soon be a common tool for helping detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease. The Journal of the Neurological Sciences recently published a University of Florida study that used peanut butter to test for loss of smell in patients with suspect cognitive and memory impairment.

Daily Activities for People With Alzheimer's Disease

As reported in the November 2012 issue of the Caring Right at Home e-newsletter, the majority of Americans with Alzheimer's disease and related conditions are living at home with the support of spouses, adult children and others who step in to serve as caregivers. Is living at home the best environment for these patients? And how do families cope with their loved one's increasing needs?

Alzheimer's Caregiving: Can You Help Too Much?

A common misperception is that most people with Alzheimer’s disease live in nursing homes or other care facilities. While supportive living communities provide a safe living environment for many people with dementia, the majority live at home, supported by our nation’s 15 million Alzheimer’s family caregivers.

Little-Known Type of Dementia Affects 1.3 Million Americans

The STARZ Channel series "Boss," starring actor Kelsey Grammer, was the first time many Americans had ever heard of Lewy body dementia. In his Golden Globe-winning performance, Grammer portrayed the fictional Mayor Tom Kane of Chicago, who was struggling with the effects of the disease.

Does Forgetting Words Signify the Beginning of Alzheimer's Disease?

Has your memory failed you today, such as struggling to recall a word that's "on the tip of your tongue?" If so, you're not alone.

Fighting the Stigma of Alzheimer's Disease

A recent report from Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) focused on negative attitudes about the disease and the impact on people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, as well as the effect on their families.